Tenterden Terrier

Terrier Number 48 – Spring 1989

Tenterden Terrier Number 48Number 48 – Spring 1989

19
Tickets, please!
John Emmott
Analysis of passengers carried in 1988.  The total number increased 12.8% to 67,289, although the average passengers per train fell in spite of the 16 extra operating days

20-22
Northiam, here we come
Gary Barker
The author, a civil enginner, describes the factors considered when designing the extension from Wittersham Road to Northiam

24-25
Linda in harness
Tom Heavyside
Photographs of Hunslet 'Austerity' 0-6-0ST “Linda” in use at Maesteg Colliery in South Wales in 1973.  “Linda” entered service on the K&ESR on 23rd August 1988

27-30
Sheila Kaye-Smith and the K&ESR

Gordon Webb
Most of this novelist's books are set in the Kent and Sussex border, and many of them include references to a fictional version of the K&ESR

36-37
The third Terrier
Neil Rose
Terrier 0-6-0T “Knowle”, built in 1880, is now being restored for use on the K&ESR.  It saw extensive use on the line from 1940 onwars as Southern Railway No. 2678 and British Railways No. 32678.  Following withdrawal in 1963, it spent some years on display at Butlin's Minehead holiday camp

38-41
“Thirteen”
Thomas Standen
Boyhood memories of Biddenden station and its staff in pre-War days

43-44
The Colonel's pipedreams.  No. 1 – From Brill to Oxford
“Morous”
The Wotton Tramway opened from Quainton Road to Brill in 1872.  In 1901, Colonel Stephens approached the Metropolitan railway, who then worked the line, with the suggestion that its proposed extension to Oxford should be built as a light railway

44-45
The “Colonel” helps Children in Need
Tom White
On 29 October 1988, a team from Chislehurst Round Table pulled locomotive No. 23 “Holman F Stephens” to raise money for the BBC Children in Need Appeal

47-48
From the railway archives
John Miller
Some details are given of Arthur Osborn (the first Station Agent at Northiam), Henry Osbourne (the only member of the Company's staff to be killed on active service in either World War), and Albert Osborne (batman to Colonel Stephens and later employed in the drawing office at Salford Terrace, Tonbridge)